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NFL Network’s Mike Mayock: “Would Be Scared To Death” to Draft Quarterback in Top 10

NFL Draft

By virtue of their 3-13 record in 2016, the Chicago Bears have the third overall pick in the upcoming NFL Draft. And, like most teams with two digits in the loss column, they have a glaring need for a quarterback.

Fortunately, with each passing year, the NFL Draft is centered more and more around the top quarterback prospects than any other position. But, as far as NFL analyst Mike Mayock is concerned, the Bears are not in an enviable position.

“All three of these quarterbacks, to me, I would be scared to death in the top 10,” Mayock said to The College Draft podcast (which you can listen to in its entirety here), while making reference to Deshaun Watson, Mitch Trubisky, and DeShone Kizer.

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The problem isn’t just that there aren’t any can’t-miss quarterbacks in this year’s class, it’s that each of the three best QB prospects have significant flaws that could simultaneously hinder their development and set a franchise – like the Bears – back in the worst way and arguably at the worst time.

Trubisky, for one example, was a one-year starter at North Carolina in 2016 with impressive numbers and an ideal body type, but plenty of outstanding questions. Specifically, how did he manage to lose out (twice) to Marquise Williams, who went undrafted last year, before signing with the Packers and being cut prior to the season?

Separately, Mayock adds that Kizer, for another example, may have the highest upside of the bunch, but mechanical breakdowns in crunch time and being pulled from potential showcase games such as Stanford and USC are major red flags.

And finally, while Watson seems like the safest pick, that might simply be due to the concerns over Trubisky and Kizer. Still, Watson will need to prove he can maintain his accuracy and decision making at the next level. Worried yet?


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All things considered, teams with quarterback needs and valuable picks high in the draft could conceivably pass on the risky college quarterback class in favor of drafting for value.

As tempting as it could be for an NFL team to address quarterback needs directly through the draft, picking the best player available over a “need” has proven time and again to be the more successful strategy.

Let’s hope the Bears keep that in mind this April.


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Luis Medina

Luis is the Lead Writer at The Ten-Yard Line, and you can find him on Twitter at @lcm1986.